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San Francisco Chronicle on Levi's Virtual Stylist

December 6, 2017

Over the past few months, Levi's new chatbot service, called Virtual Assistant, has seen a lot interest from both consumers and media. The San Francisco Chronicle sat down with Levi's Executive Vice President Marc Rosen to discuss the company's digital efforts and their ability to become a leader in e-commerce.   

According to the article, Mr. Rosen says "We started to think how are we going to differentiate, what is really going to matter to consumers. And the biggest challenge for a consumer is that it’s very hard to buy jeans online.” True Fit data reports that upwards to 40 percent of clothing and footwear purchased online is returned, and jeans is no exception. 

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Brian Kilcourse, managing director of RSR Research consulting firm says "[returns are] becoming a real big problem. “It’s just a really bad deal” for both consumers and retailers. He pointed out to the San Francisco Chronicle that consumers have to take the time and effort to send the clothing back. And during that period, retailers have less inventory to sell to other shoppers. 

To help mitigate this issue, Levi's developed the Virtual Stylist, which helps consumers find the best pair of jeans (or other clothes available on Levi's site) for the individual. The article reports that "using bots, the tool starts asking consumers questions like “How would you like your jeans to fit through your hips and thighs?” to explore shoppers’ preferences on leg shape, rise and stretch."  

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Virtual Stylist incorporates True Fit's data-driven technology, allowing "consumers to compare how a specific size of jeans made by other manufacturers like Lucky or Wrangler translates into Levi’s sizes. For example, a size 31 Lucky jeans might actually mean a size 33 for Levi’s."

Mr. Rosen told the San Francisco Chronicle that when you're shopping in-store, associates can "send you to the fitting room with three or four pairs of jeans.” The Virtual Stylist aims to take that experience "and replicate that for the consumer online. We know there are all these emerging technologies retailers haven’t put together yet.”

Visit www.levis.com to check out the Virtual Stylist for yourself!